Ask me anything

looooooool
tkyle:

I will never let this meme die.

tkyle:

I will never let this meme die.

(via realitytvgifs)

2 days ago
1,560 notes
Do not try to be pretty. You weren’t meant to be pretty; you were meant to burn down the earth and graffiti the sky. Don’t let anyone ever simplify you to just “pretty.”

Things I Wish My Mother Had Taught Me | d.a.s

(via bl-ossomed)

(via theneverbird)

2 days ago
420,799 notes

shakespearelove:

i-m-a-good-viper:

Lesbians:

image

Men:

image

Aaaaaaaand I can’t breathe.

(via sickly--summertime)

5 days ago
175,386 notes

meowsatan:

carleecochina:

itsananobrain:

Childish Gambino on Ferguson

Ily

He is the best

(Source: hiphopdx.com, via theneverbird)

5 days ago
29,677 notes
becausebirds:

An amethyst in bird-form, meet the Costa’s Hummingbird. A desert hummingbird, Costa’s Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona.

look how fucking cute this god damned bird is

becausebirds:

An amethyst in bird-form, meet the Costa’s Hummingbird. A desert hummingbird, Costa’s Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona.

look how fucking cute this god damned bird is

5 days ago
11,750 notes
I am not Mike Brown. I am white. I am middle class. I am female. I am small. I am not considered a threat. When police see me they see someone who looks like them. They see their mothers, their daughters, their sisters, themselves. I am not at risk of being shot by police for existing while black. I am not at risk of being shot while unarmed. I am not at risk of being shot while armed with nothing more than a BB gun. I am not at risk of being shot for reaching for my wallet. I am privileged.
But I am outraged. And if you aren’t outraged, then you aren’t paying attention. This is America in 2014. This is our reality. It’s so easy to get jaded and to ignore these atrocities, to act like this doesn’t affect us. It’s so easy to get apathetic. In the past it was the youth who protested. Where is the rage of the youth? Where is our rage?
Like I said, I am not Mike Brown. But I am outraged.

apriki:

DRAKE IS HAVING A BREAKDOWN GUYS

I think Drake literally looks so fuckable here my vagina was about to crawl out of my body.

(via sickly--summertime)

2 days ago
34,623 notes
"You're just fighting fire with fire" is bullshyt because

thereedsuecationofbbwatkins:

thegirlwhoplaysgod:

thereedsuecationofbbwatkins:

feminism5ever:

  1. It equates the anger of the oppressed with the oppression they face.
  2. It blames the oppressed for their oppression.
  3. It invalidates the anger of the oppressed.
  4. It demands that the oppressed just sit quietly, be nice to their oppressors and accept the status quo.

This really…

There’s a difference between saying someone should fight violence with violence and saying oppressed groups have a right to be angry and fight back. Guess what? Black Americans are being murdered because of racism and police brutality. They have a right to fight back and not just be like, “well I’m not going to fight murder with violence.”

No. FUCK. THAT. The system that allows this needs to be destroyed. End of story, no fucking argument. Absolutely NO ONE should be standing by while this happens. It’s not okay for an oppressive group to have the power to murder individuals, to use that power, and then to say, “you’re not allowed to use violence to fight back because that’s just fighting fire with fire.”

I can not even begin to speak to how infuriating this mindset is. 

Oh yes you’re absolutely right. I guess I was thinking about it specifically in the context of large scale wars and more specifically 9/11 where the US who was not being oppressed got attacked and then has spent 13 years going insane in two countries. That’s more what I was talking about. Pointless war. I absolutely do not think the people of ferguson should just sit and take what is happening to them.

Oh girl, fucking preach to all that.

5 days ago
1,438 notes
lesbeehive:

Me and Mrs Doubtfire
I, like a lot of people, was raised by pop culture. Growing up queer in a Christian home where my parents were more preoccupied with their own lives than with that of their children, it was pop culture that was always there. Television, movies, books, magazines, music, these voices were the ones that sang me to sleep at night, taught me how to be strong, showed me worlds beyond my isolated religious home. It’s from this interaction that things like this site exist today – I have always understood the importance of visual media in one’s individual life.
I found parental figures in pop culture. I found moms who loved through laughter and toughness and attentiveness. I found siblings who listened and taught and protected. And I found dads. My own father was absent for most of my adolescence, gone to a job he hated, and when he was home, his anger formed a bubble around him that pushed everyone away. In pop culture I found fathers who laughed, who were silly, who disciplined in gentle but firm ways, who thought of their kids first and themselves second. One of the best of my pop culture dads was Robin Williams.
Once our household got a copy of Mrs Doubtfire, I watched it over and over and over, and would continue to watch it repeatedly from ages 16 to 21. I know every hook, every line, every expression in that movie. My brain imprinted the face of Robin Williams in my minds eye, and he became my Dad, just like he became all of our dads. He was silly, and funny, and clever, and above all else, loving. Empathetic to his children’s pain, and willing to do whatever it took to help them. Before this, I thought those kind of dads only existed in movies or on television, but his love, his devotion was so real in this movie, that it became real to me.
I never met Robin Williams. I had a friend who was gaming in a comic book store in Vancouver when Robin Williams walked in, sat down with him and his friends and started making jokes, making them all laugh, and hung out with them for a whole hour, talking to them, asking them questions. This story confirmed to me what I already knew, that he was capable of amazing empathy, that he loved to make people happy and that he was lonely, all things that I feel and have felt very often throughout my life. If I had been able to actually talk to him, I would have thanked him for being him. For showing a little girl that fathers could love, that there was other people like me out there and that above all else, for teaching me the importance of joy.

lesbeehive:

Me and Mrs Doubtfire

I, like a lot of people, was raised by pop culture. Growing up queer in a Christian home where my parents were more preoccupied with their own lives than with that of their children, it was pop culture that was always there. Television, movies, books, magazines, music, these voices were the ones that sang me to sleep at night, taught me how to be strong, showed me worlds beyond my isolated religious home. It’s from this interaction that things like this site exist today – I have always understood the importance of visual media in one’s individual life.

I found parental figures in pop culture. I found moms who loved through laughter and toughness and attentiveness. I found siblings who listened and taught and protected. And I found dads. My own father was absent for most of my adolescence, gone to a job he hated, and when he was home, his anger formed a bubble around him that pushed everyone away. In pop culture I found fathers who laughed, who were silly, who disciplined in gentle but firm ways, who thought of their kids first and themselves second. One of the best of my pop culture dads was Robin Williams.

Once our household got a copy of Mrs Doubtfire, I watched it over and over and over, and would continue to watch it repeatedly from ages 16 to 21. I know every hook, every line, every expression in that movie. My brain imprinted the face of Robin Williams in my minds eye, and he became my Dad, just like he became all of our dads. He was silly, and funny, and clever, and above all else, loving. Empathetic to his children’s pain, and willing to do whatever it took to help them. Before this, I thought those kind of dads only existed in movies or on television, but his love, his devotion was so real in this movie, that it became real to me.

I never met Robin Williams. I had a friend who was gaming in a comic book store in Vancouver when Robin Williams walked in, sat down with him and his friends and started making jokes, making them all laugh, and hung out with them for a whole hour, talking to them, asking them questions. This story confirmed to me what I already knew, that he was capable of amazing empathy, that he loved to make people happy and that he was lonely, all things that I feel and have felt very often throughout my life. If I had been able to actually talk to him, I would have thanked him for being him. For showing a little girl that fathers could love, that there was other people like me out there and that above all else, for teaching me the importance of joy.

(via suicideblonde)

5 days ago
983 notes